I just…. I don’t even…. What?

I just…. I don’t even…. What?

8 things your foodservice staff wish you remembered

feels-like-fire:

I’ve worked in food service (hostess, server, bartender) for over a decade now, and from time to time I feel the need to bitch. I thought this post would be slightly more constructive than pure bitching, though. (Mind, this list is for the USA, so feel free to disregard if it doesn’t apply to you.)

Put in order from least to most desired. #1 probably isn’t what you think it is, either.

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This is wonderful.

pridefulvanity:

next time someone tells you Muslim countries oppress women, let them know Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Turkey, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, and Senegal have all had female Presidents or Prime Ministers and 1/3rd of Egypt’s parliament is female but the US has yet to even have a female vice president and can’t say “vagina” when discussing female reproductive rights

What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.

Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez (via psychotherapy)

fuckyeahforensics:

Here’s a look at what those stains are trying to tell you.

1 Angular If the victim was on the move, drops hit at an angle. The more oblique the impact, the longer the drop’s tail. The head points in the direction the person was traveling.
2 High Velocity (term not really used anymore)
Misty, diffuse spatter is created by external force greater than 100 feet per second — which usually means a gunshot, an explosion, or (seriously) a sneeze.


3 Hair Impact
A traumatic impact between head and surface tends to leave a stain with feathered edges, like someone squished a loaded paintbrush against the wall.

4 Hair Swipe If the smear fades out in one direction, the head was likely bloody before contact. The lightest edge of the swipe points in the direction the head was traveling.
5 Fabric Swipe More fluid than hair swipes, these stains sometimes display the imprint of the bloodied clothing. T-shirt weaves are often the easiest patterns to decipher.

fuckyeahforensics:

Here’s a look at what those stains are trying to tell you.

1 Angular
If the victim was on the move, drops hit at an angle. The more oblique the impact, the longer the drop’s tail. The head points in the direction the person was traveling.

2 High Velocity (term not really used anymore)
Misty, diffuse spatter is created by external force greater than 100 feet per second — which usually means a gunshot, an explosion, or (seriously) a sneeze.
3 Hair Impact
A traumatic impact between head and surface tends to leave a stain with feathered edges, like someone squished a loaded paintbrush against the wall.

4 Hair Swipe
If the smear fades out in one direction, the head was likely bloody before contact. The lightest edge of the swipe points in the direction the head was traveling.

5 Fabric Swipe
More fluid than hair swipes, these stains sometimes display the imprint of the bloodied clothing. T-shirt weaves are often the easiest patterns to decipher.

There is a fundamental reason why we look at the sky with wonder and longing—for the same reason that we stand, hour after hour, gazing at the distant swell of the open ocean. There is something like an ancient wisdom, encoded and tucked away in our DNA, that knows its point of origin as surely as a salmon knows its creek. Intellectually, we may not want to return there, but the genes know, and long for their origins—their home in the salty depths. But if the seas are our immediate source, the penultimate source is certainly the heavens… The spectacular truth is—and this is something that your DNA has known all along—the very atoms of your body—the iron, calcium, phosphorus, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and on and on—were initially forged in long-dead stars. This is why, when you stand outside under a moonless, country sky, you feel some ineffable tugging at your innards. We are star stuff. Keep looking up.

Neil deGrasse Tyson 

This just gave me chills/almost made me cry. 

(via perpetualtoska)

(Source: nguyen-hoang-huy)